Landscape & Native Plants

Photo: Rachel Ormiston/Burke Museum
Photo: Rachel Ormiston/Burke Museum

Coming Soon! The landscape to the east and southeast of the New Burke is in the finishing stages of planting.

For nearly four years, the Native Plant Nursery at Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center in Carnation, Washington, grew some 70,000 plants—representing more than 50 native plant species—for the new Burke Museum landscape, designed by Gustafson Guthrie Nichol (GGN). 

Read the Seattle Times story

close up of a flowering camas plant
Photo: Nikki Macgregor/Burke Museum
Photo: Nikki Macgregor/Burke Museum

A Camas Prairie

A key feature of the landscape is sweeping Camas meadow. Camas is a traditional food source for Native peoples throughout Washington.

For thousands of years, camas prairies have been cultivated using techniques like burning, weeding and selective harvesting. These wild camas prairies once covered much of Washington but are becoming more and more rare. Great camas, death camas, fawn lily, and chocolate lily seeds were collected by Oxbow for the Burke during a trip to the San Juan Islands in 2015.

Native peoples of Washington state have many uses and traditions associated with these plants, and intergenerational sharing continues to pass this plant knowledge from generation to generation. The Burke Camas meadow will bring a new resource for teaching and learning to our front door.

Highlights
 

  • 95% of the plants in the Burke landscape were grown from seed. Growing from seed is slower, but has important long-term benefits. When plants are grown using other methods, like cuttings or dividing root balls, each new plant is genetically identical to the original plant. When grown from seed, each individual plant is genetically different from one another, creating a more resilient group of plants.
     
  • Many species were grown in the Oxbow nursery for four years before finally being planted at the Burke!
     
  • The evergreen huckleberry plants were started from seed three years ago in order to reach the size they are at the Burke now.
  • Oregon grape seed needs a treatment lasting 120 days in order for the seed to germinate and sometimes can take up to two seasons to germinate. On the other hand, yarrow seed can be sown and will germinate about 1 week later.
     
  • Plant species like wild ginger thrive in the moist forest understory, so Oxbow grew them in a shady space, with plenty of irrigation and organic matter in their soil to keep them happy.
     
  • Species like sedum and succulents love to be in the hot sun and remain fairly dry, so they were grown in brighter areas, sandier soil, and with careful attention to not overwatering them.

Trees

close up of a tree
Close up of a tree branch

Western red cedar

Thuja plicata

close up of a tree branch

Big-leaf maple

Acer macrophyllum

close up of a tree branch

Oregon ash

Fraxinus latifolia

close up of a tree branch

Garry oak

Quercus garryana

close up of a tree branch

Pacific madrone

Arbutus menziesii

close up of a tree branch

Vine maple

Acer circinatum

close up of a tree branch

Douglas maple

Acer douglasii

close up of a tree branch

Pacific yew

Taxus brevifolia

close up of a tree branch

Western hemlock

Tsuga heterophylla

Gaultheria Shallon Mix

close up of a flowering plant

Evergreen huckleberry

Vaccinium ovatum

close up of a flowering plant

Virginia strawberry

Fragaria virginiana

close up of a flowering plant

Oregon stonecrop

Sedum oreganum

close up of a flowering plant

Spreading stonecrop

Sedum divergens

close up of a flowering plant

Broadleaf stonecrop

Sedum spathulifolium

close up of a flowering plant

Silverweed cinquefoil

Potentilla anserina

Sun Shrub Mix

close up of a flowering plant

Evergreen huckleberry

Vaccinium ovatum

close up of a plant

Manzanita 'Martha Swan'

Arctostaphylos x media

close up of a flowering plant

Woodland strawberry

Fragaria vesca

close up of a plant

Silverweed cinquefoil

Potentilla anserina

 

close up of a plant

Common yarrow

Achillea millefolium

Dryopteris Filix-Mas Mix

close up of a plant

Western wild ginger

Asarum caudatum

close up of a plant

False Solomon's seal

Maianthemum racemosum 

close up of a plant

False lily of the valley

Maianthemum dilatatum

close up of a plant

Redwood sorrel

Oxalis oregana

close up of a plant

Oak fern        

Gymnocarpium dryopteris

close up of a plant

Polystichum Munitum Mix

close up of a plant
close up of a plant

Dwarf Oregon grape

Mahonia nervosa

close up of a plant

Western bunchberry

Cornus unalaschkensis

close up of a plant

Western white trillium

Trillium ovatum

close up of a plant

Inside-Out flower

Vancouveria hexandra

Camas Field Mix

close up of a plant in a person's hand

Roemer’s fescue

Festuca roemeri

close up of a flowering plant

Columbian lewisia

Lewisia columbiana

close up of a flowering plant

Taper-tip onion

Allium acuminatum

close up of a flowering plant

Nodding onion

Allium cernuum

close up of a flowering plant

Showy fleabane

Erigeron speciosus

close up of a flowering plant

Chocolate lily

Fritillaria affinis

close up of a flowering plant

Indian consumption plant

Lomatium nudicaule

close up of a flowering plant

Bladder parsnip

Lomatium utriculatum

close up of a flowering plant

Sicklekeel lupine

Lupinus albicaulis

close up of a flowering plant

Oregon sunshine

Eriophyllum lanatum

close up of a flowering plant

Common yarrow

Achillea millefolium

close up of a flowering plant

Common camas

Camassia quamash

close up of a flowering plant

Leichtlin's camas

Camassia leichtlinii