Burke Blog

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Lower jaw of the T. rex

The Burke paleontology team is preparing a portion of the lower right jaw from the 66.3-million-year-old T. rex discovered this summer.

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Hairy woodpecker specimens in the Burke collection

In addition to distinct belly coloration, Burke researchers found that species east and west of the North Cascades are genetically different.

People + Cultures

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Highlighting and celebrating the heritage of Native peoples in our state, region and country.

The traditional jukung in the Burke's offsite storage.

The Burke Museum has a traditional jukung in its Culture collections, but until recently its origins were a mystery.

Environments

Woman kneeling on forest bed

How tiny fossilized plant particles in Costa Rica can be used to reconstruct past landscapes.

UW graduate student Chuck Beightol excavates a dinocephalian skeleton in Zambia, 2014.

The Zambian and Tanzanian fossil beds preserved both plants and animals, providing information on paleoclimate before and after extinction.

Close-up of fossil phytolith.

By extracting phytoliths from once-living plants, scientists were able to uncover a story of vegetation change in response to climate.

Northwest Native Art

Shovelnose canoes once again journey the Columbia River

A groundbreaking project to reestablish traditional dugout canoe culture among their five Inland Northwest member tribes.

Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley’s journey to replicate a feast dish in the Burke Museum collection.

Kéet Ooxú (Killer Whale Teeth) (left, far right): Shgen George, Tlingit, 2014

Connections to older artworks often provide the spark that keeps Native artists inspired in today's growing art scene. 

Science

Carlos Mauricio Peredo studying the 27-million-year-old-fossil whale in our Life & Times exhibit

The 27-million-year-old fossil whale on display in our Life & Times exhibit is officially a new species! 

Student scanning a mammoth skull.

The Burke Museum and College of Engineering are collaborating to scan and 3-D print a large-scale mammoth.

An extinct animal often cited as a ‘missing link’ between modern seals and their four-limbed, land-dwelling ancestors.

Burke Research

Rockfishes

Researchers are uncovering new insights about the early stages of life for several Puget Sound fishes.

Three researchers look at bat

A Burke research team recently surveyed fruit bats living on the small island of Grenada.

DeVries Peruvian research area.

Raked by vigorous winds, with not a blade of grass in sight, Peru’s desert coast looks remarkably different from its past.

Washington State

Hairy woodpecker specimens in the Burke collection

In addition to distinct belly coloration, Burke researchers found that species east and west of the North Cascades are genetically different.

Red-flanked bluetail

A rare Asian songbird was far off course last December when it fatally struck a window on Lopez Island.

Green Darner Dragonfly specimen

Did you know that the Washington state insect is the Green Darner Dragonfly?

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