Burke Blog

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Columbia River at Kennewick

Information about the remains known as Kennewick Man/The Ancient One, one of the oldest and most complete skeletons found in North America. 

Learn about the Burke's research on the coastal-tailed frog, one of the specimens on display in our Wild Nearby exhibit.

New Burke construction site

New Burke construction is underway! Check this page for notable construction updates.

People + Cultures


 Beginning 4,000 years ago, a revolution swept through Island Southeast Asia. People shifted from living solely on wild foods to farming and raising domestic animals. Why did this change in livelihood occur?

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Highlighting and celebrating the heritage of Native peoples in our state, region and country.

Environments

Learn about the Burke's research on the coastal-tailed frog, one of the specimens on display in our Wild Nearby exhibit.


How do you catch the Northern Bog Lemming? Mammaology researchers from the Burke traveled to the North Cascades in pursuit of this elusive creature - find out if they were successful!

Read about Ana Maria Bedoya's expedition to Colombia to study the tropical diversity of river-weed plants. 

Northwest Native Art

Shovelnose canoes once again journey the Columbia River

A groundbreaking project to reestablish traditional dugout canoe culture among their five Inland Northwest member tribes.

Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley’s journey to replicate a feast dish in the Burke Museum collection.

Kéet Ooxú (Killer Whale Teeth) (left, far right): Shgen George, Tlingit, 2014

Connections to older artworks often provide the spark that keeps Native artists inspired in today's growing art scene. 

Science

A rendering of the early marsupial relative, Didelphodon vorax.

A new study describes an early mammal that had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

Carlos Mauricio Peredo studying the 27-million-year-old-fossil whale in our Life & Times exhibit

The 27-million-year-old fossil whale on display in our Life & Times exhibit is officially a new species! 

Student scanning a mammoth skull.

The Burke Museum and College of Engineering are collaborating to scan and 3-D print a large-scale mammoth.

Burke Research

A photograph of a partial gorgonopsid lower jaw, but not the specimen in which the odontoma was discovered.

When paleontologists cut into the fossilized jaw of a distant mammal relative, they got more than they bargained for—more teeth, to be specific.

Researcher collecting fossils in Antarctica

Burke paleontologists travel to Antarctica to collect 250-million-year-old fossils from the Triassic period.

Washington State

Hairy woodpecker specimens in the Burke collection

In addition to distinct belly coloration, Burke researchers found that species east and west of the North Cascades are genetically different.

Red-flanked bluetail

A rare Asian songbird was far off course last December when it fatally struck a window on Lopez Island.

Green Darner Dragonfly specimen

Did you know that the Washington state insect is the Green Darner Dragonfly?

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