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HALLOWEEN'S ANCIENT ROOTS:
 
From Ireland and Rome to The United States

Halloween PumpkinsCeltic Traditions
America's Halloween is rooted in ancient European customs and religious symbolism. More than 2,000 years ago in Celtic Ireland, the festival of Samhain ("sow-en") celebrated the final harvest and coming of winter at the end of October. The boundary between the living and the Otherworld diminished and it was believed that the spirits of the dead could return to their earthly homes. The Tuatha de Danaan - a race with magical powers - emerged from the Sidhe ("shee"), the land of the fairies. Evil spirits might also come, intent on causing harm to the living. Communal bonfires were lit to honor the gods. In some communities, people paraded in animal costumes.

Roman Influences
When the Romans conquered Gaul in 50 BC, their festival of Feralia was merged with Samhain. Feralia honored the souls of benevolent ancestors by offering them food on their graves. The Romans also introduced the autumn harvest festival honoring Pomona, the goddess of gardens and fruit. Apples symbolized Pomona, and were also the divine fruit of the Celtic paradise. Elements of these and other festivals have remained important in Halloween today.
 

  DAY OF
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  EGYPTIAN
MUMMY
 
 
INDONESIAN
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