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Featured Fungi


Pluteus cervinus

This common mushroom grows from a variety of woody substrates including sawdust and wood chips. In forests and wood lots it grows on logs and stumps, and can be found throughout the mushrooms season, but is most common in the spring and again in the fall season. It has a stalk, free gills, no veils of any kind, and a pink spore print. It is related to Volvariella volvacea, the Paddy Straw Mushroom, and Volvariella speciosa, both of which produce mushrooms that are enclosed by a universal veil when young. The former is grown commercially for food, the latter occurs in gardens, parks and fields throughout the region but is not commonly found.

Pluteus cervinus is part of the Burke Museum's Featured Fungi 2009 series.


Pluteus cervinus

Pluteus cervinus
Photo by J. Ammirati