Northwest Coast Carving Demonstration

Saturday, January 6, 2018
10 AM – 4 PM

INCLUDED WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION; FREE FOR MEMBERS, W/UW ID, AND CHILDREN 4 & UNDER

Testing, Testing 1-2-3 exhibit gallery

Community members carve masks in the Testing, Testing 1-2-3 ethnology workroom.

Community members carve masks in the Testing, Testing 1-2-3 ethnology workroom.

Photo: Burke Museum

A photo of a fish trap lure depicting a carving of a boy inside a salmon

Master Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley will begin carving a replica of this fish trap lure at the Northwest Coast Carving Demonstration on Saturday, January 6.
Photo: Burke Museum

Drop by our Testing, Testing 1-2-3 exhibit on Saturday, January 6, to see carvers, including master Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley, produce new work inspired by carving practices of indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast.

We'll have the doors open in the ethnology workroom so you can view the carving process, interact with carvers, and learn more about how they connect with the traditional knowledge held in carvings in the Burke's ethnology collection.

Special Guest

The Burke Museum and Sealaska Heritage Institute are collaborating on a project to replicate a fish trap lure in the Burke culture collections. The replica of the lure, which depicts the Tlingit story Aak'wtaatseen ("Alive in the Eddy"), will be carved by master Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley and featured in Sealaska Heritage Institute's new exhibit, Aan Yátx’u Sáani ("People of the Land"). Boxley will begin working on the replica, which will be made of red cedar, during the Northwest Coast Carving Demonstration on Saturday, January 6.

About David A. Boxley

David A. Boxley is a world-renowned Tsimshian artist from Metlakatla, Alaska known for his spectacular wood carvings. He uses traditional Tsimshian techniques to create totem poles, bentwood boxes, rattles, masks and panels.

Learn more about David A. Boxley and his work.

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