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Washington State
Brandon Peecook

Graduate Student Brandon Peecook and Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology Christian Sidor described Washington’s first dinosaur fossil in May 2015.

microscope focused on tiny fossilized creatures known as foraminifera

Foraminifera are tiny one-celled marine organisms that live on the sea floor and have a big story to tell about the health of Puget Sound.

What are foraminifera? What can they tell us about the health of Puget Sound? 

An illustration of the longfin sculpin (Jordania zonope)

In total, 253 fish species have been recorded in the Salish Sea, and that’s about 14 percent more than in the last count.

Washington's first dinosaur fossil gives insight into what the west coast was like 80 million years ago.

Lou-ann Neel holds a model totem carved by her grandfather in the culture collections

The Burke is dedicated to collaborating with diverse Native populations, sharing collections and learning together. 

A chance encounter on a windy day leads to the discovery of a new spider habitat. 

The water-logged tusk was encased in plaster

Seattle is abuzz after construction workers find an unexpected guest from the ice age.

washington state map showing localities of plant specimens in WTU database

A map of Washington state showing all vascular plant specimen localities in the Herbarium WTU collections database.

yellow-orange flowers

Explore the complete checklist of the vascular plants of Washington state.

Map view of San Juan Islands

A tool for mapping the distributions of vascular plant species in the San Juan Islands.

Comparative photo of Seattle’s changing landscape

Seattle is one of the most dramatically re-engineered cities in the United States.

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