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Vertebrate Paleontology
Tiny microfossil teeth

Studying microfossil teeth of the Sagebrush Vole from Washington state to understand a pattern of evolution.

Researcher collecting fossils in Antarctica

Burke paleontologists travel to Antarctica to collect 250-million-year-old fossils from the Triassic period.

A local 10-year-old discovered a fossilized mammoth tooth while walking along the beach on Whidbey Island.

Paleontologists prepare the plaster field jacket on a T. rex skull

Burke Museum paleontologists discovered a T. rex in Montana, including a very complete skull.

Carlos Mauricio Peredo studying the 27-million-year-old-fossil whale in our Life & Times exhibit

The 27-million-year-old fossil whale on display in our Life & Times exhibit is officially a new species! 

Exploring how (and when) whales, dolphins and porpoises evolved the ability to efficiently swim through the water. 

Student scanning a mammoth skull.

The Burke Museum and College of Engineering are collaborating to scan and 3D print a large-scale mammoth.

An extinct animal often cited as a ‘missing link’ between modern seals and their four-limbed, land-dwelling ancestors.

Carnivore fossils in the Burke Museum paleontology collection.

How does competition between species affect their long-term evolution?

Bruce cuts into the cast containing the Columbian mammoth tus

We started removing the cast covering LuLu the Columbian mammoth's tusk to get a glimpse into its preservation.

Burke paleontologists collected the partial skull of what's likely a Columbian mammoth after it was found along an eroded bluff near Sequim.

seal fossil

What can the fossil record tell us about how seals and sea lions evolved into the animals they are today?

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