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Vertebrate Paleontology
The T. rex skull in progress in the Testing, Testing 1-2-3 workroom

The T. rex skull jacket is open, with the skull and the teeth almost fully revealed. 

We're reconstructing a full-scale Columbian mammoth using a combination of real and 3D-printed fossils from the collection.

Visiting researcher Carlos Peredo returns to study early baleen whale fossils. 

The massive T. rex skull jacket presented quite a unique challenge. That's where the "Rex Rack" comes in.

Fossil preparator Bruce Crowley sits on the ground while excavating a large T. rex rib bone

What else was hiding in those dusty hills? The team headed back out to find more of the T. rex this summer.

Analyzing the limited samples of the oviraptorosaur to answer lingering questions about this species' growth and anatomy.

Read about Susumu Tomiya's use of photos of tiny teeth samples in his research to discover the prehistoric origins of modern-day carnivores.

Learn about the Burke’s expedition to Hell Creek and their remarkable discovery of a baby Triceratops frill.

Dig into the excavations of Burke curator Christian Sidor's team and their discovery of fossils of early carnivorous dinosaurs. 

A photograph of a partial gorgonopsid lower jaw, but not the specimen in which the odontoma was discovered.

When paleontologists cut into the fossilized jaw of a distant mammal relative, they got more than they bargained for—more teeth, to be specific.

A rendering of the early marsupial relative, Didelphodon vorax.

A new study describes an early mammal that had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

Lower jaw of the T. rex

The Burke paleontology team is preparing a portion of the lower right jaw from the 66.3-million-year-old T. rex discovered this summer.

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