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Triceratops
New Burke windows with blue sky

The New Burke siding continues to go up as the exterior elevator used by construction crews comes down. 

A crane is used to apply siding to the New Burke

The construction of the New Burke Museum continues to move at an impressive pace! Take a peek inside.

We're reconstructing a full-scale Columbian mammoth using a combination of real and 3D-printed fossils from the collection.

Documenting the biodiversity of an important group of animals—one shell at a time. 

Kristin Campbell holding a sea otter skull in the Burke mammal collection

Researcher Kristin Campbell looks into whether skull anatomy and bite force explain dietary differences in sea otters.

Construction of the New Burke Museum is really coming along! It is nearly 65% complete. 

The Malacology Collection includes more than 75,000 specimen lots.

The Burke Museum Herbarium is revising the guide to vascular plants of the Pacific Northwest.

Monacanthus ciliatus, fringed filefish

Burke Museum scientists leading effort to create a digital encyclopedia of 3D vertebrate specimens. 

Visiting researcher Carlos Peredo returns to study early baleen whale fossils. 

The massive T. rex skull jacket presented quite a unique challenge. That's where the "Rex Rack" comes in.

Fossil preparator Bruce Crowley sits on the ground while excavating a large T. rex rib bone

What else was hiding in those dusty hills? The team headed back out to find more of the T. rex this summer.

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