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A photograph of a partial gorgonopsid lower jaw, but not the specimen in which the odontoma was discovered.

When paleontologists cut into the fossilized jaw of a distant mammal relative, they got more than they bargained for—more teeth, to be specific.

A rendering of the early marsupial relative, Didelphodon vorax.

A new study describes an early mammal that had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

Steller's Jay on a branch

Do bird populations living on different mountain ranges evolve independently of one another?

Researcher collecting fossils in Antarctica

Burke paleontologists travel to Antarctica to collect 250-million-year-old fossils from the Triassic period.

Carlos Mauricio Peredo studying the 27-million-year-old-fossil whale in our Life & Times exhibit

The 27-million-year-old fossil whale on display in our Life & Times exhibit is officially a new species! 

Student scanning a mammoth skull.

The Burke Museum and College of Engineering are collaborating to scan and 3-D print a large-scale mammoth.

An extinct animal often cited as a ‘missing link’ between modern seals and their four-limbed, land-dwelling ancestors.

Carnivore fossils in the Burke Museum paleontology collection.

How does competition between species affect their long-term evolution?

Force transducer setup used to measure the bite force of bats.

How hard can a bat bite, and why does it matter?

Cortinarius parkeri, a common spring species in conifer forest.

Developing “barcodes” with fungi DNA helps easily identify species. 

UW graduate student Chuck Beightol excavates a dinocephalian skeleton in Zambia, 2014.

The Zambian and Tanzanian fossil beds preserved both plants and animals, providing information on paleoclimate before and after extinction.

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