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Plants & Fungi
sketches of Centaurea plants

We’re revising Flora of the Pacific Northwest, published in 1973, with updated information for over 5,300 varieties of vascular plants.

Cortinarius parkeri, a common spring species in conifer forest.

Developing “barcodes” with fungi DNA helps easily identify species. 

Zebra jaw showing high-crowned teeth.

Researchers sink their teeth into this tricky evolutionary question. 

Close-up of fossil phytolith.

By extracting phytoliths from once-living plants, scientists were able to uncover a story of vegetation change in response to climate.

Camas by US Forest Service Northern Region.

Plants were an integral part of the Coast Salish diets prior to Euro-American colonization but also played central roles in social systems.

Grass phytolith from an open-habitat grass discovered in the ancient soils.

30 million years ago, the world lacked its grass-dominated environments, but 70 million years ago, grasses had not evolved—or so we think. 

pressed specimens

The WTU Herbarium's total holdings number more than 650,000 specimens of vascular and nonvascular plants, fungi, lichens and marine algae.

washington state map showing localities of plant specimens in WTU database

A map of Washington state showing all vascular plant specimen localities in the Herbarium WTU collections database.

yellow-orange flowers

Explore the complete checklist of the vascular plants of Washington state.

Map view of San Juan Islands

A tool for mapping the distributions of vascular plant species in the San Juan Islands.

An interactive mapping tool that displays ranges of weeds and invasive plants in Washington state.

While there have been enormous changes in Coast Salish Native diet and culture over the centuries, a core value of food has survived.

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