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People & Cultures

The Sugpiat community’s traditional Angyaaq boat is reconstructed and leaves shore for the first time in over a century.

Burke Museum visitors examine the blanket found to contain woolly dog fur.

A small tear in a blanket revealed a rare piece of history hiding in plain sight.

Burke archaeologists are working to preserve ancestral artifacts owned by the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe in the North Cascades. 

UW Pacific Islander students used their experience as Burke researchers to decode Oceanic objects and traditions in Disney's Moana

Columbia River at Kennewick

Information about the remains known as Kennewick Man/The Ancient One, one of the oldest and most complete skeletons found in North America. 

Beginning 4,000 years ago, people shifted from living solely on wild foods to farming and raising domestic animals. Why did this change occur?

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Highlighting and celebrating the heritage of Native peoples in our state, region and country.

Jadeite Adze in Wood

This stone woodcarving adze—broken and embedded in a piece of cedar—is unlike most items in our archaeological collections. 

The traditional jukung in the Burke's offsite storage.

The Burke Museum has a traditional jukung in its Culture collections, but until recently its origins were a mystery.

Shovelnose canoes once again journey the Columbia River

A groundbreaking project to reestablish traditional dugout canoe culture among their five Inland Northwest member tribes.

student researchers in the ethnology collections

They come from diverse backgrounds and life experiences, but have come together to change perceptions. 

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