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People & Cultures
student researchers in the ethnology collections

They come from diverse backgrounds and life experiences, but have come together to change perceptions. 

Marshallese community members touch the jaki-ed in the Burke collection to connect with their ancestors

The March 1 ceremony was incredibly emotional, both for the Marshallese community, but also for many of the people who joined the Marshallese in solidarity.

Model Angyaaq next to frame

Working with communities to rebuild a traditional Native boat-building practice, bringing this knowledge back into a living context. 

Noted 19th century Haida carver Charles Edenshaw with the chest.

“As I was carving this chest front I felt like I was reconnecting with my ancestor.” – Christian White, Bill Holm Center grant recipient.

Youth in Kodiak, Alaska, hold the model angyaats they built with curator Sven Haakanson

After nearly a century of silence, Kodiak youth and adults learn how to build a traditional model Angyaat.

Camas by US Forest Service Northern Region.

Plants were an integral part of the Coast Salish diets prior to Euro-American colonization but also played central roles in social systems.

Curator Sven Haakanson cleans a bear intestine

Referencing Burke collections to reverse-engineer how this material was made and used in the past so it can be used again in the present.

Cory Fuavai researches Samoan objects from the Burke’s collection not only for his coursework, but also to become a matai chief.

Danny carefully glues parts on a pump drill as John Timu looks on.

Danny Shelton builds a stronger connection to his heritage and inspires his fellow classmates to pursue their own cultural research.

Bruce Alfred takes a closer look at the mask

We look back at what we’ve learned about the Native mask that inspired the original Seattle Seahawks logo in the past year.

Comparative photo of Seattle’s changing landscape

Seattle is one of the most dramatically re-engineered cities in the United States.

A color photo of the mask that inspired the Seahawks logo

The mask that inspired the Seattle Seahawks logo is discovered to be part of the Hudson Museum collection in Maine.

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