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Northwest Native Art
Shovelnose canoes once again journey the Columbia River

A groundbreaking project to reestablish traditional dugout canoe culture among their five Inland Northwest member tribes.

Kininnook's pole

Totem poles are thought of as symbols of Seattle by many residents and visitors, but, in fact, the indigenous people of Washington state did not traditionally carve totems. 

Siagut basket

The tools and technologies to make basketry, woven robes, canoes and other carvings.

Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley’s journey to replicate a feast dish in the Burke Museum collection.

Noted 19th century Haida carver Charles Edenshaw with the chest.

“As I was carving this chest front I felt like I was reconnecting with my ancestor.” – Christian White, Bill Holm Center grant recipient.

Kéet Ooxú (Killer Whale Teeth) (left, far right): Shgen George, Tlingit, 2014

Connections to older artworks often provide the spark that keeps Native artists inspired in today's growing art scene. 

Introducing the updated 50th anniversary edition of Bill Holm’s definitive book on northern Northwest Coast art.

Outside Red Mill Totem Fish and Chips.

Despite its popularity, the identity of the carvers who made the poles has been misrepresented for years. 

Bruce Alfred takes a closer look at the mask

We look back at what we’ve learned about the Native mask that inspired the original Seattle Seahawks logo in the past year.

Carved comb showing four-legged animal

The design of Coast Salish carving, its iconography (meaning), and how it relates to other region styles.

A color photo of the mask that inspired the Seahawks logo

The mask that inspired the Seattle Seahawks logo is discovered to be part of the Hudson Museum collection in Maine.

Kwakwaka'wakw transformation mask as pictured in Robert Bruce Inverarity's 1950 book, Art of the Northwest Coast Indians

A Northwest Coast Native mask is identified as the inspiration for the Seattle Seahawks original logo after years of speculation. 

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