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Mammalogy
Flying squirrel in tree

For hundreds of years, a species of flying squirrel was hiding right under (actually, above) our noses.

Learn about Burke curator Sharlene Santana's research in Costa Rica about the unique dynamic between short-tailed fruit bats and New World pepper plants.

Mammaology researchers from the Burke traveled to the North Cascades in pursuit of the elusive Northern Bog Lemming.

Three researchers look at bat

A Burke research team recently surveyed fruit bats living on the small island of Grenada.

Mammalogy specimens

The Mammalogy Collection database includes over 55,000 specimen records.

Mammalogy placeholder

An interactive tree diagram showing the pathways of relatedness and historical evolution of today’s 29 different mammal orders.

olympic marmot in field

Washington is home to 141 species of mammals. Learn all about their habits and habitats, what they eat, where they live, and more.

Force transducer setup used to measure the bite force of bats.

How hard can a bat bite, and why does it matter?

The Townsend’s big-eared bat

Various bat species have different needs to survive, which can severely decrease their ability to cope with habitat fragmentation. 

red-eared guenon

Burke researchers analyzed monkey facial patterns and found both social and environmental connections.

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