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Frogs
Great Basin Spadefoot

The Great Basin Spadefoot can emit a smell when picked up that is similar to peanuts that can also make you sneeze!

Oregon Spotted Frog

The Oregon Spotted Frog is currently very threatened in Washington state, having disappeared from 70-90% of their range.

Northern Leopard Frog

Northern Leopard Frog populations were once widespread throughout the northern U.S. and Canada, but current populations are decreasing.

Columbia Spotted Frog

Thought to hibernate in mud under water, there is evidence that Columbia Spotted Frogs actually move around under the ice in winter.

Green Frog

The Green Frog has been introduced into two areas in Washington StateToad Lake in Whatcom County and Lake Gillette in Stevens County.

American Bullfrog

American Bullfrogs are an introduced species in Washington State, originally found only to the east of the Rocky Mountains.

Cascades Frog

Cascades Frogs prefer quiet water sources including ponds, lakes, marshes or slow moving streams at low elevations.

Northern Red-Legged Frog

Northern Red-legged Frogs can be found primarily west of the Cascade Mountains in Washington state.

Pacific Tree Frog

Pacific Tree Frogs usually live on the ground (despite their name) and hide in underground burrows.

Anaxyrus woodhousii

Woodhouse's Toads can be found in river valleys, meadows, grasslands, and marshes in southwestern region of Washington state.

Western Toad

Western Toads dig shallow burrows in loose ground or shelter under rocks or logs.

Tailed Frog

Tailed Frog males do not vocalize, possibly because the females cannot hear calls over fast-moving water in streams.

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