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Fossils
UW graduate student Chuck Beightol excavates a dinocephalian skeleton in Zambia, 2014.

The Zambian and Tanzanian fossil beds preserved both plants and animals, providing information on paleoclimate before and after extinction.

Zebra jaw showing high-crowned teeth.

Researchers sink their teeth into this tricky evolutionary question. 

Close-up of fossil phytolith.

By extracting phytoliths from once-living plants, scientists were able to uncover a story of vegetation change in response to climate.

Grass phytolith from an open-habitat grass discovered in the ancient soils.

30 million years ago, the world lacked its grass-dominated environments, but 70 million years ago, grasses had not evolved—or so we think. 

Washington's first dinosaur fossil gives insight into what the west coast was like 80 million years ago.

The water-logged tusk was encased in plaster

Seattle is abuzz after construction workers find an unexpected guest from the ice age.

Largest petrified log at the park.

Hunting for fossils isn’t as glamorous as it’s cracked up to be. 

In the early 1990s, a group of elementary school students in Washington noticed an important piece of their state's history was missing.

Preparation is a time consuming process.

A labor of love! Burke paleontologists take steps to preserve the South Lake Union mammoth tusk.

Dr. Christian Sidor makes a snow wall to shelter his tent.

Rock exposures are rare in the icy wastes of Antarctica, but they are the only places where finding fossils is possible.

Bruce Crowley with the tusk found in Seattle.

Washington state is home to a wide variety of fossils. Best of all, there age has several fossil sites that are open to the public!

Researcher Regan Dunn reconstructs what types of vegetation existed in ancient Patagonia

Researcher Regan Dunn reconstructs what types of vegetation existed in ancient Patagonia to understand the impact of climate change.

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