Topic Page

Fossils
A rendering of the early marsupial relative, Didelphodon vorax.

A new study describes an early mammal that had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

Lower jaw of the T. rex

The Burke paleontology team is preparing a portion of the lower right jaw from the 66.3-million-year-old T. rex discovered this summer.

Tiny microfossil teeth

Studying microfossil teeth of the Sagebrush Vole from Washington state to understand a pattern of evolution.

Researcher collecting fossils in Antarctica

Burke paleontologists travel to Antarctica to collect 250-million-year-old fossils from the Triassic period.

A local 10-year-old discovered a fossilized mammoth tooth while walking along the beach on Whidbey Island.

Paleontologists prepare the plaster field jacket on a T. rex skull

Burke Museum paleontologists discovered a T. rex in Montana, including a very complete skull.

Carlos Mauricio Peredo studying the 27-million-year-old-fossil whale in our Life & Times exhibit

The 27-million-year-old fossil whale on display in our Life & Times exhibit is officially a new species! 

Exploring how (and when) whales, dolphins and porpoises evolved the ability to efficiently swim through the water. 

Student scanning a mammoth skull.

The Burke Museum and College of Engineering are collaborating to scan and 3D print a large-scale mammoth.

An extinct animal often cited as a ‘missing link’ between modern seals and their four-limbed, land-dwelling ancestors.

Carnivore fossils in the Burke Museum paleontology collection.

How does competition between species affect their long-term evolution?

Woman kneeling on forest bed

How tiny fossilized plant particles in Costa Rica can be used to reconstruct past landscapes.

Pages

Back to Top