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Dinosaurs
Julie Stein (left), Richard Olmstead (middle) and David Giblin hold the madrone specimen—the first object to be moved into the New Burke.

A specimen from a tree that once stood on the site of the new Burke Museum is the first object to be moved into the new building.

An illustration of Wimahl chinookensis.

Meet Wimahl chinookensis, a new species of fossil dolphin that lived about 18 million years ago in the waters of the Pacific Northwest.

Researcher Ana Bedoya Ovalle returns to Colombia to collect and study river-weed plants in South America.

Researcher Ana Bedoya Ovalle returns to Colombia to collect and study river-weed plants in South America.

Researcher Ashley Pickard visits the Burke Museum to study shoe samples from the Japanese Gulch archaeological site.

Drawing of the welcome figure that will welcome visitors to the New Burke

The Burke Museum has commissioned a Coast Salish art piece for the lobby of the New Burke.

Less than two years later after the New Burke’s official groundbreaking, construction on the New Burke building is complete! 

Michelle Stocker, Sterling Nesbitt and Ken Angielczyk conduct fieldwork in Tanzania in 2015.

UW paleontologists and geologists, including Burke curator Christian Sidor, have uncovered new fossils in Zambia and Tanzania.

Visiting researcher Dr. Robert Bossenecker recently discovered a new species of prehistoric seal in the Burke’s paleontology collection.

Visiting researcher Dr. Robert Bossenecker recently discovered a new species of prehistoric seal in the Burke’s paleontology collection.

Some of the baby plants being installed at the New Burke.

Thousands of native Northwest plants are going in on the north, west and south sides of the New Burke.

The rooftop skylight brings in natural light into the New Burke, from top to bottom.

The New Burke is coming together, with gorgeous skylights illuminating progress on the interior of the building.

The “Pocket Bats” outreach program uses augmented reality to allow people to hold replicas of bat skulls in the palm of their hand.

The “Pocket Bats!” outreach program uses augmented reality to allow people to hold replicas of bat skulls in the palm of their hand. 

Tribal elders from across Washington offered a cedar brushing ceremony to acknowledge the commitment of the Burke community during the move to the new facility.

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