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Culture
student researchers in the ethnology collections

They come from diverse backgrounds and life experiences, but have come together to change perceptions. 

Marshallese community members touch the jaki-ed in the Burke collection to connect with their ancestors

The March 1 ceremony was incredibly emotional, both for the Marshallese community, but also for many of the people who joined the Marshallese in solidarity.

Model Angyaaq next to frame

Working with communities to rebuild a traditional Native boat-building practice, bringing this knowledge back into a living context. 

Kininnook's pole

Totem poles are thought of as symbols of Seattle by many residents and visitors, but, in fact, the indigenous people of Washington state did not traditionally carve totems. 

Ed Carriere woven basket

The Ethnological Collection at the Burke Museum includes objects dating from the late 1700s to the present.

Portrait of Cory Fuavai

Cory Fuavai is a UW student doing research at the Burke to support of his goal to become a Samoan Matai chief.

Siagut basket

The tools and technologies to make basketry, woven robes, canoes and other carvings.

Tsimshian artist David A. Boxley’s journey to replicate a feast dish in the Burke Museum collection.

Noted 19th century Haida carver Charles Edenshaw with the chest.

“As I was carving this chest front I felt like I was reconnecting with my ancestor.” – Christian White, Bill Holm Center grant recipient.

Duwamish River in 1906

For millennia, the Duwamish River sustained a diverse ecosystem before experiencing a dramatic transformation wrought by human engineering.

Kéet Ooxú (Killer Whale Teeth) (left, far right): Shgen George, Tlingit, 2014

Connections to older artworks often provide the spark that keeps Native artists inspired in today's growing art scene. 

Youth in Kodiak, Alaska, hold the model angyaats they built with curator Sven Haakanson

After nearly a century of silence, Kodiak youth and adults learn how to build a traditional model Angyaat.

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