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Culture

UW Pacific Islander students used their experience as Burke researchers to decode Oceanic objects and traditions in Disney's Moana

Beginning 4,000 years ago, people shifted from living solely on wild foods to farming and raising domestic animals. Why did this change occur?

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Highlighting and celebrating the heritage of Native peoples in our state, region and country.

Jadeite Adze in Wood

This stone woodcarving adze—broken and embedded in a piece of cedar—is unlike most items in our archaeological collections. 

The traditional jukung in the Burke's offsite storage.

The Burke Museum has a traditional jukung in its Culture collections, but until recently its origins were a mystery.

Dr. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Curator of Northwest Native Art

The Burke Museum is pleased to welcome Dr. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse as the new Curator of Northwest Native Art.

student researchers in the ethnology collections

They come from diverse backgrounds and life experiences, but have come together to change perceptions. 

Marshallese community members touch the jaki-ed in the Burke collection to connect with their ancestors

The March 1 ceremony was incredibly emotional, both for the Marshallese community, but also for many of the people who joined the Marshallese in solidarity.

Model Angyaaq next to frame

Working with communities to rebuild a traditional Native boat-building practice, bringing this knowledge back into a living context. 

Kininnook's pole

Totem poles are thought of as symbols of Seattle by many residents and visitors, but, in fact, the indigenous people of Washington state did not traditionally carve totems. 

Ed Carriere woven basket

The Ethnological Collection at the Burke Museum includes objects dating from the late 1700s to the present.

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