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Coast Salish
Burke Museum visitors examine the blanket found to contain woolly dog fur.

A small tear in a blanket revealed a rare piece of history hiding in plain sight.

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Kininnook's pole

Totem poles are thought of as symbols of Seattle by many residents and visitors, but, in fact, the indigenous people of Washington state did not traditionally carve totems. 

Siagut basket

The tools and technologies to make basketry, woven robes, canoes and other carvings.

Duwamish River in 1906

For millennia, the Duwamish River sustained a diverse ecosystem before experiencing a dramatic transformation wrought by human engineering.

Camas by US Forest Service Northern Region.

Plants were an integral part of the Coast Salish diets prior to Euro-American colonization but also played central roles in social systems.

Carved comb showing four-legged animal

The design of Coast Salish carving, its iconography (meaning), and how it relates to other region styles.

Innovative Coast Salish art being produced in the tradition of the artists' ancestors.

The tools and technologies to make canoes and other carvings.

Map of Coast Salish region and cultural groups

Explore the geographic region of the Coast Salish people, their history, language, and tribal names.

Sucia Figure

Works of art in the form of carved bone, stone, horn and basketry have been found and dated back to 5,000 years ago.

Sucia figure, Coast Salish Art

An introduction to the art of the First Peoples of western Washington and southwestern British Columbia who speak the Coast Salish languages.

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