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Burke Research
Himantolophus stewarti described by Ted as new to science in 2011.

That’s a face only a mother could love!… Or maybe a scientist.

Youth in Kodiak, Alaska, hold the model angyaats they built with curator Sven Haakanson

After nearly a century of silence, Kodiak youth and adults learn how to build a traditional model Angyaat.

Camas by US Forest Service Northern Region.

Plants were an integral part of the Coast Salish diets prior to Euro-American colonization but also played central roles in social systems.

Curator Sven Haakanson cleans a bear intestine

Referencing Burke collections to reverse-engineer how this material was made and used in the past so it can be used again in the present.

golden king crab

Study finds egg masses of snailfishes deposited inside the gill cavity of North Pacific king crabs using molecular techniques.

Grass phytolith from an open-habitat grass discovered in the ancient soils.

30 million years ago, the world lacked its grass-dominated environments, but 70 million years ago, grasses had not evolved—or so we think. 

The Townsend’s big-eared bat

Various bat species have different needs to survive, which can severely decrease their ability to cope with habitat fragmentation. 

Cory Fuavai researches Samoan objects from the Burke’s collection not only for his coursework, but also to become a matai chief.

red-eared guenon

Burke researchers analyzed monkey facial patterns and found both social and environmental connections.

Megapode at night

Megapodes cleverly harness environmental heat sources to incubate their eggs.

A chance encounter on a windy day leads to the discovery of a new spider habitat. 

Liolaemus and Rainbow

Studying hybrid zones offers a unique view into the evolutionary processes that either generate or extinguish species.

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