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Burke Research
Ted Pietsch in the Burke fish collections.

Ted Pietsch retired in July after 37 years as Burke Museum curator of fishes and professor in the UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

Force transducer setup used to measure the bite force of bats.

How hard can a bat bite, and why does it matter?

Horned lizard sitting on a rock.

Though the lizards may seem like a portal to a bygone era, their habitat and survival faces serious threats today.

Brandon Peecook

Graduate Student Brandon Peecook and Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology Christian Sidor described Washington’s first dinosaur fossil in May 2015.

DeVries Peruvian research area.

Raked by vigorous winds, with not a blade of grass in sight, Peru’s desert coast looks remarkably different from its past.

Cortinarius parkeri, a common spring species in conifer forest.

Developing “barcodes” with fungi DNA helps easily identify species. 

A male Anolis krugi, Mata de Plátano, Puerto Rico.

Matt McElroy hopes to answer how and why biological evolution occurred in the past, and what role thermal adaptation played in this process.

UW graduate student Chuck Beightol excavates a dinocephalian skeleton in Zambia, 2014.

The Zambian and Tanzanian fossil beds preserved both plants and animals, providing information on paleoclimate before and after extinction.

Zebra jaw showing high-crowned teeth.

Researchers sink their teeth into this tricky evolutionary question. 

Close-up of fossil phytolith.

By extracting phytoliths from once-living plants, scientists were able to uncover a story of vegetation change in response to climate.

Hummingbird pollinating plants.

The mystery of these tiny, but hearty, birds' migratory patterns is starting to unfold.

An illustration of the longfin sculpin (Jordania zonope)

In total, 253 fish species have been recorded in the Salish Sea, and that’s about 14 percent more than in the last count.

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