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Burke Research
A photograph of a partial gorgonopsid lower jaw, but not the specimen in which the odontoma was discovered.

When paleontologists cut into the fossilized jaw of a distant mammal relative, they got more than they bargained for—more teeth, to be specific.

A rendering of the early marsupial relative, Didelphodon vorax.

A new study describes an early mammal that had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

Steller's Jay on a branch

Do bird populations living on different mountain ranges evolve independently of one another?

Researcher collecting fossils in Antarctica

Burke paleontologists travel to Antarctica to collect 250-million-year-old fossils from the Triassic period.

Woman kneeling on forest bed

How tiny fossilized plant particles in Costa Rica can be used to reconstruct past landscapes.

Three researchers look at bat

A Burke research team recently surveyed fruit bats living on the small island of Grenada.

Model Angyaaq next to frame

Working with communities to rebuild a traditional Native boat-building practice, bringing this knowledge back into a living context. 

Ted Pietsch in the Burke fish collections.

Ted Pietsch retired in July after 37 years as Burke Museum curator of fishes and professor in the UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

Force transducer setup used to measure the bite force of bats.

How hard can a bat bite, and why does it matter?

Horned lizard sitting on a rock.

Though the lizards may seem like a portal to a bygone era, their habitat and survival faces serious threats today.

Brandon Peecook

Graduate Student Brandon Peecook and Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology Christian Sidor described Washington’s first dinosaur fossil in May 2015.

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