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Burke Research

UW Pacific Islander students used their experience as Burke researchers to decode Oceanic objects and traditions in Disney's Moana

Read about the Burke's research into what the future holds for spiders and other species in forest areas cleared for logging.

Learn about Burke curator Sharlene Santana's research in Costa Rica about the unique dynamic between short-tailed fruit bats and New World pepper plants.

Learn about the Burke's research on the coastal-tailed frog, one of the specimens on display in our Wild Nearby exhibit.

A photograph of a partial gorgonopsid lower jaw, but not the specimen in which the odontoma was discovered.

When paleontologists cut into the fossilized jaw of a distant mammal relative, they got more than they bargained for—more teeth, to be specific.

A rendering of the early marsupial relative, Didelphodon vorax.

A new study describes an early mammal that had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

Steller's Jay on a branch

Do bird populations living on different mountain ranges evolve independently of one another?

Researcher collecting fossils in Antarctica

Burke paleontologists travel to Antarctica to collect 250-million-year-old fossils from the Triassic period.

Woman kneeling on forest bed

How tiny fossilized plant particles in Costa Rica can be used to reconstruct past landscapes.

Three researchers look at bat

A Burke research team recently surveyed fruit bats living on the small island of Grenada.

Model Angyaaq next to frame

Working with communities to rebuild a traditional Native boat-building practice, bringing this knowledge back into a living context. 

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