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Burke Research
Researcher Ana Bedoya Ovalle returns to Colombia to collect and study river-weed plants in South America.

Researcher Ana Bedoya Ovalle returns to Colombia to collect and study river-weed plants in South America.

Researcher Ashley Pickard visits the Burke Museum to study shoe samples from the Japanese Gulch archaeological site.

Michelle Stocker, Sterling Nesbitt and Ken Angielczyk conduct fieldwork in Tanzania in 2015.

UW paleontologists and geologists, including Burke curator Christian Sidor, have uncovered new fossils in Zambia and Tanzania.

The “Pocket Bats” outreach program uses augmented reality to allow people to hold replicas of bat skulls in the palm of their hand.

The “Pocket Bats!” outreach program uses augmented reality to allow people to hold replicas of bat skulls in the palm of their hand. 

Reviving a Jukung through Burke Museum collections.

Burke researchers learn more about the Burke’s Balinese “jukung” outrigger canoe.

The Burke’s Paleontology team ventured to the Petrified Forest and found specimens that can answer questions about the Late Triassic period.

The Burke’s Paleontology team ventured to the Petrified Forest and found specimens that can answer questions about the Late Triassic period.  

Herbarium researcher Mark Darrach helped discovered a new plant species – and plans to auction off the right to name it.

Herbarium researcher Mark Darrach helped discovered a new plant species – and plans to auction off the right to name it. 

We're reconstructing a full-scale Columbian mammoth using a combination of real and 3D-printed fossils from the collection.

Kristin Campbell holding a sea otter skull in the Burke mammal collection

Researcher Kristin Campbell looks into whether skull anatomy and bite force explain dietary differences in sea otters.

The Burke Museum Herbarium is revising the guide to vascular plants of the Pacific Northwest.

Monacanthus ciliatus, fringed filefish

Burke Museum scientists leading effort to create a digital encyclopedia of 3D vertebrate specimens. 

The Sugpiat community’s traditional Angyaaq boat is reconstructed and leaves shore for the first time in over a century.

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