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Burke Research
The “Pocket Bats” outreach program uses augmented reality to allow people to hold replicas of bat skulls in the palm of their hand.

The “Pocket Bats!” outreach program uses augmented reality to allow people to hold replicas of bat skulls in the palm of their hand. 

Kristin Campbell holding a sea otter skull in the Burke mammal collection

Researcher Kristin Campbell looks into whether skull anatomy and bite force explain dietary differences in sea otters.

Monacanthus ciliatus, fringed filefish

Burke Museum scientists leading effort to create a digital encyclopedia of 3D vertebrate specimens. 

The Sugpiat community’s traditional Angyaaq boat is reconstructed and leaves shore for the first time in over a century.

Flying squirrel in tree

For hundreds of years, a species of flying squirrel was hiding right under (actually, above) our noses.

A new species of goby was discovered while being chased by an invasive lionfish outside of Curacao.

flowering purple butterfly bush

Graduate student John Chau discovers the origin of the Butterfly-bush, a familiar flowering plant in the Seattle area.

At the Burke, we have a lot of big dreams—from discovering a T. rex to inspiring the next generation of paleontologists, weavers, conservationists and scientists.

Read how the remarkable find of 5 species of critically endangered tree frogs will influence Mexico's conservation efforts for its rare frog species!.

UW Pacific Islander students used their experience as Burke researchers to decode Oceanic objects and traditions in Disney's Moana

Read about the Burke's research into what the future holds for spiders and other species in forest areas cleared for logging.

Learn about Burke curator Sharlene Santana's research in Costa Rica about the unique dynamic between short-tailed fruit bats and New World pepper plants.

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