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Archaeology
Columbia River at Kennewick

Information about the remains known as Kennewick Man/The Ancient One, one of the oldest and most complete skeletons found in North America. 


 Beginning 4,000 years ago, a revolution swept through Island Southeast Asia. People shifted from living solely on wild foods to farming and raising domestic animals. Why did this change in livelihood occur?

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Jadeite Adze in Wood

This stone woodcarving adze—broken and embedded in a piece of cedar—is unlike most items in our archaeological collections. 

The traditional jukung in the Burke's offsite storage.

The Burke Museum has a traditional jukung in its Culture collections, but until recently its origins were a mystery.

Duwamish River in 1906

For millennia, the Duwamish River sustained a diverse ecosystem before experiencing a dramatic transformation wrought by human engineering.

Camas by US Forest Service Northern Region.

Plants were an integral part of the Coast Salish diets prior to Euro-American colonization but also played central roles in social systems.

Comparative photo of Seattle’s changing landscape

Seattle is one of the most dramatically re-engineered cities in the United States.

Mountain view from the San Juan Islands.

The people who come on these tours of San Juan Island are curious about one thing: stories of people and place. 

Duwamish river

Explore the dramatic changes to Seattle's landscapes and shorelines through The Waterlines Project.

While there have been enormous changes in Coast Salish Native diet and culture over the centuries, a core value of food has survived.

Aerial photograph of West Point

A 1992 construction site led to a significant discovery of cultural remains of local Native Americans that lived at and used the site for thousands of years.

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