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Amphibians & Reptiles
Pacific Gopher Snake

Pacific gopher snake eggs are some of the largest eggs of any snake found in the United States.

Striped Whipsnake

Striped Whipsnakes can be found in certain parts of western United States and northern Mexico.

California Mountain Kingsnake

The entire length of California Mountain Kingsnakes consist of repeating bands of red, black, and white.

Desert Nightsnake

Desert nightsnakes are often mistaken for rattlesnakes but their venom is harmless to humans.

Ring-necked Snake

When threatened by a predator, Ring-necked Snakes will coil their tail and display their bright underside.

Sharp-tailed snake

Some scientists believe that sharp-tailed snakes may use their sharp tails to help stabilize slugs for capture. 

Western Racer

There are many subspecies of Racers, each of which have very different ranges.

Great Basin Spadefoot

The Great Basin Spadefoot can emit a smell when picked up that is similar to peanuts and can make you sneeze!

Oregon Spotted Frog

The Oregon Spotted Frog is currently very threatened in Washington state, and have disappeared from 70-90% of their range.

Northern Leopard Frog

Northern Leopard Frog populations were once widespread throughout the Northern U.S. and Canada, but current population is decreasing.

Columbia Spotted Frog

Thought to hibernate in mud under water, there has been evidence that Columbia Spotted Frog actually move around under the ice in winter.

Green Frog

The Green Frog has been introduced into two areas in Washington State; Toad Lake in Whatcom County and Lake Gillette in Stevens County.

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