Returning to Antarctica

December 8, 2017
Burke Museum
Christian Sidor stands on a mountaintop during his 2010 trip to Antarctica.

Christian Sidor stands on a mountaintop during his 2010 trip to Antarctica.
Photo: Roger Smith

Christian Sidor, Burke Museum Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology and University of Washington (UW) Biology professor, is doing scientific fieldwork in Antarctica until early February and collecting fossil vertebrates to bring back to the Burke’s collection. 

The skull of Prolacerta was quite delicate and easily disarticulated. You can see some of the small, needle-like teeth in the jaws.

The skull of Prolacerta was quite delicate and easily disarticulated. You can see some of the small, needle-like teeth in the jaws.
Photo: Burke Museum

This is Christian’s fourth visit to Antarctica—a place where he’s done extensive paleontology research in the past. Joining Christian on this trip is a research team consisting of geologists and paleontologists from UW, the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles, the Field Museum, and more.

This trip, Christian and the team are focusing their fieldwork in the Shackleton Glacier area—an area last visited by researchers in the 1980s.

Before Christian left, we asked him what he hopes to accomplish on this research trip…

 

Here’s a tweet Christian sent when the team arrived in Antarctica. Follow him on Twitter (@ChristianSidor) to see more from his trip (when he has WiFi access!).

Learn about Christian’s last trip to Antarctica, and see more from Vertebrate Paleontology.

Back to Top