Bill Holm Center grant recipients, 2016-2017

April 6, 2016
Burke Museum

The Bill Holm Center offers both visiting researcher and workshop grants. The visiting researcher grants provide individual or groups of artists and other researchers access to Burke Museum resources for research on art from the Pacific Northwest region (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and Alaska). Our workshop grants support hands-on learning events at the both the Burke and in the artists’ home communities of the Pacific Northwest region.

Learn more about grant opportunities on our Bill Holm Center Grants page.

 

2016-2017 Recipients

Natalie Ball
Natalie (Klamath, Modoc) creates installations and performative art in a uniquely Indigenous way, inspired from her traditional roots. Natalie enjoyed studying basketry from Klamath, Modoc and down river tribes of Yurok, Karuk, and Hupa. Natalie explored Klamath River related collections items for inspiration in her daily life including ceremonies, artwork, and research for her Master’s program at Yale. 

Lynda Belt
Lynda Belt works at the Karshner Museum and Center for Culture and Arts. She met with Justin McCarthy and Ashley McClelland at the Burke Museum to identify Coast Salish and Plateau objects to further her knowledge of objects in the Karshner Museum. Lynda also learned about basic object storage at the Burke Museum. 

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith
Ka’ila is a contemporary artist who brings her Klamath and Modoc Indigenous roots into her painting and art forms. She viewed wocus (water lily) and processing materials, dolls, pestles and mortars, and our extensive Klamath River basketry items. Ka’ila is involved in gathering and processing traditional materials in her contribution to the transmission of Klamath cultural knowledge, so enjoyed viewing our preserved food objects. She incorporates designs from the basketry items as inspiration for her contemporary painting practice.

Ryan Feddersen
Ryan Feddersen (Colville) visited the Burke with her uncle and mentor, Joe Feddersen, in November 2016 to study Plateau style basketry. She brought her sister Carly Feddersen in April 2017. They studied examples of twining, corn husk bags, and basketry from the Colville/Okanogan region as inspiration for their different contemporary Indigenous art practices. 

Marge Kalama and Celeste Whitewolf
Marge and Celeste (Warm Springs) studied beadwork from the Oregon Plateau region. Marge was interested in beaded belts, dresses, gauntlets, moccasins, and vests, while Celeste studied Plateau style baskets, woven hats, corn husk bags, round baskets, and rawhide cases and storage bags. Marge was interested in studying the Burke’s examples of older style beading in order to incorporate into her current work. The Burke even bought a pair of beaded shoes from Marge for our collections!

Liz Hammond-Kaarremaa
Liz is a Coast Salish spinning expert who visited the Burke to study Coast Salish textiles such as blankets, robes, tump lines, and yarn for her research into spinning characteristics. When Liz viewed the wooly dog blanket in our collections, she suggested we send it off for testing because she suspected it wasn’t made of mountain goat. It looked to her, much more like woolly dog blankets she had studied in Smithsonian collections. You can read more about the woolly dog blanket in the Burke Collections here.

Natalie Ball

Natalie Ball

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith

Ka’ila Farrell-Smith

(L-R) Joe Feddersen and Ryan Feddersen

(L-R) Joe Feddersen and Ryan Feddersen

(L-R) Ursala Hudson and Lily Hope

(L-R) Ursala Hudson and Lily Hope  

Dusty Humphries

Dusty Humphries

(L-R) Tyson Simmons, Dusty Humphries, and Brian Perry

(L-R) Tyson Simmons, Dusty Humphries, and Brian Perry 

Lily Hope and Ursala Hudson
Sisters Lily and Ursala (Tlingit) visited the Burke in place of their late mother, Clarissa Rizal, master Tlingit weaver. Lily and Ursala demonstrated Chilkat and Ravenstail style weaving for the public and gave two lectures on their weaving styles, history, and their mother’s legacy. They viewed our Tlingit textiles, basketry, and other Tlingit objects in our collections to inform their practice.

Dusty Humphries
Dusty is a Jamestown S’Klallam and Makah carver involved in making Northwest Native masks, totem poles, tools, bentwood boxes, and other woodwork. Dusty visited the Burke collections with Tyson Simmons under the mentorship of prior BHC grantee Brian Perry. Dusty also donated one of his masks to the Burke Museum Collections! 

Kandi McGilton
Kandi is a Tsimshian artist from Metlakatla, Alaska and brought renowned Haida artist, Delores Churchill, as a mentor to study the Burke collections. Kandi beads and weaves, with an emphasis on Tsimshian style false embroidery. Kandi came to the Burke to study different types of regalia and basketry made with beadwork and cedar, as this is the primary medium that she and Delores work with. 

Sara Seistreem
Sara (Hanis Coos), an established weaver and fiber artist, came to the Burke to study basketry, household items, tools, and regalia from the Southern Coast of Oregon. Sara was interested in studying these objects in order to inform her work on reactivating her traditional weaving practice. 

Tyson Simmons
Tyson is a Muckleshoot carver and tool maker who visited the Burke collections with Dusty Humphries under the mentorship of prior BHC grantee Brian Perry. Both artists enjoyed studying the Coast Salish adze’s and tools. Tyson and Dusty even collaborated less than a week after their visit to create an elbow adze inspired from their collections visit!

John Smith
John (Yup’ik) and his daughter Teddi visited the Burke collections hailing from Hooper Bay and Quinhagak, Alaska to view Yup’ik items. John, Yup’ik carver, subsistence hunter, and culture bearer shared his extensive cultural knowledge and stories with us. John gave us a beautiful and informative glimpse into the traditional Yup’ik way of life.

(L-R) Kandi McGilton and Delores Churchill

(L-R) Kandi McGilton and Delores Churchill

Sara Seistreem

Sara Seistreem

Tyson Simmons

Tyson Simmons

(L-R) John Smith holding a Yup’ik mask and daughter Teddi Smith

(L-R) John Smith holding a Yup’ik mask and daughter Teddi Smith 

Marie Knight at the Onsite portion of the workshop.

Marie Knight at the Onsite portion of the workshop. 

(L-R) Marie Knight, Susan Balbas, and Ellany Kayce at the Onsite portion of the workshop.

(L-R) Marie Knight, Susan Balbas, and Ellany Kayce at the Onsite portion of the workshop. 

Collections-Based Workshop Grants

Na’ah Illahee Fund
Susan Balbas (Cherokee, Yaqui) of the Na’ah Illahee Fund invited weaver Marie Knight (Warm Springs) to lead a Plateau-style basketry workshop. A group of weavers visited the Burke collections to view traditional corn husk style flat bags as inspiration for their offsite workshop. The group especially enjoyed speculating about the different designs, what the designs could represent, and the stories they could tell.  

Miles Miller
Miles Miller (Yakama) held a Plateau style beading workshop and visited the Burke collections in the end of June. The Offsite Workshop was held August 19th at the Yakima Valley Museum. Miles and five other Yakama artists attended both Onsite and Offsite Workshops. Elza Weaslehead even graciously donated a pair of beaded moccasin to the Burke collections.

Theresa Parker Basketry Workshop
In collaboration with the University of Washington's wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ - Intellectual House, the BHC supported a cedar bark basketry workshop with Master weaver, Theresa Parker (Makah) and Deanna Buzzell-Gray (Makah). Theresa and Deanna helped students make different sizes and styles of cedar bark baskets and jewelry. The BHC staff brought several baskets from our collections to the workshop to facilitate learning and inspiration.

Misty Kalama and Kendall Archer
Misty Kalama (Puyallup) hosted an offsite workshop with Kendall Archer (Skokomish) on Coast Salish spindle whorl wool spinning with the Chehalis Tribe.

(L-R) Natalia Esquivel starting a basket with Deanna Buzzel-Gray

(L-R) Natalia Esquivel starting a basket with Deanna Buzzel-Gray

(L-R) Misty Kalama-Archer instructing wool spinning to Charlene Krise (Squaxin) and Jodie Smith (Chehalis).

(L-R) Misty Kalama-Archer instructing wool spinning to Charlene Krise (Squaxin) and Jodie Smith (Chehalis). 

Spinning wool at Marge Kalama and Kendall Archer’s workshop.

Spinning wool at Marge Kalama and Kendall Archer’s workshop. 

Back to Top