Bill Holm Center grant recipients

October 30, 2014
Bill Holm Center

The Bill Holm Center offers both visiting researcher and workshop grants. The visiting researcher grants provide individual or groups of artists and other researchers access to Burke Museum resources for research on art from the Pacific Northwest region (Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and Alaska). Our workshop grants support hands-on learning events at the both the Burke and in the artists’ home communities of the Pacific Northwest region.

Learn more about grant opportunities on our Bill Holm Center Grants page.

2015–2016 Recipients

Visiting Researcher Grants

Sam Dimmick Inupiat stone carving artist Sam Dimmick visited the Burke in October 2016 to study our arctic collections, examining many masks, carvings, model umiaks, and tools.

Alison Bremner Bremner, a Yakutat Tlingit artist, came to the Burke with her mentor, Tsimshian master artist David A. Boxley, and her apprentice, an emerging Yakutat artist Devlin Anderstrom, to study northern Northwest Coast carvings, spoons, trays, and bentwood boxes. Bremner plans to share her research here with the emerging artists in her hometown of Yakutat, AK.

Patti Puhn Squaxin Island weaver Patti Puhn visited the Burke in February 2016 with her sister and apprentice JeNene Miller to study the cattail and cedar bark clothing and basketry in the collections. After her visit, Puhn donated one of her baskets to the Burke collection!

Dan Friday Lummi glass artist Dan Friday came to the Burke in February, April, and August 2016 to study our Coast Salish collections as inspiration for his contemporary work. Friday also brought his sister Raya Friday, a multimedia artist, along in his visits and the siblings studied work of their great-great grandfather Xa-Tel-Ek (Frank Hillaire) that we have in the collection.

DeAnn Jacobson Duwamish weaver DeAnn Jacobson received both a Visiting Researcher grant and a Collections-Based Workshop grant. Jacobson visited the Burke in April 2016 for her research grant to study Duwamish baskets and clothing, including baskets made by her anscestor Princess Angeline, or Kikisoblu, Chief Seattle's youngest daughter. 

Steve Grafe Grafe, the Curator of Art at the Maryhill Museum of Art, visited the Burke in April 2016 to study 19th and 20th century Columbia River Plateau beadwork, particularly beaded clothing, accessories, and bags.

Shawn Brigman Shawn Brigman, a Spokane artist, visited the Burke to study our model sturgeon nosed canoe and then traveled with Justin McCarthy, our Collections Outreach Coordinator, to the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia to study their full-size sturgeon nosed canoe in August 2016. Brigman has made a number of his own full size sturgeon nosed canoes.

 

Sam Dimmick (R) with Outreach Coordinator Justin McCarthy

Sam Dimmick (R) with Outreach Coordinator Justin McCarthy

Alison Bremner, David A. Boxley, and Devlin Anderstrom (L-R)

Alison Bremner, David A. Boxley, and Devlin Anderstrom (L-R)

Patti Puhn and JeNene Miller (L-R)

Patti Puhn and JeNene Miller (L-R)

Dan Friday

Dan Friday

DeAnn Jacobson

DeAnn Jacobson

Shawn Brigman

Shawn Brigman studying the sturgeon nosed canoe at the Museum of Anthropology with BHC Outreach Coordinator Justin McCarthy (R-L)

Brian Perry Port Gamble S'Klallam artsit Brian Perry visited the Burke in August 2016 to study Coast Salish carvings and basketry. He was particularly interested in basketry designs and how to incorporate them into his own work. Artist Qwalsius - Shawn Peterson joined Perry for a day of his research as well.

Plateau Beadwork and Basketry Group In August 2016 Colville and Spokane artists and makers Shelly Boyd, Bernadine Phillips, Vera Best, Gina Lawrence, Dena Moses and her mother Norma McCrea visited the Burke together to spend a few days studying Colville and Spokane beadwork, basketry, and clothing. 

Collection-Based Workshop Grants

Suquamish Museum The Bill Holm Center helped fund and support the First Annual Salish Wool Weavers Symposium and Workshops held at the Suquamish Museum in February 2016. For the onsite portion of the grant, the Bill Holm Center then hosted one group of wool weavers and one group of carvers for collections visits, in March and April 2016, respectively. The weavers studied contemporary and historical wool weavings, with some of the older pieces measuring 10 feet long. The carvers studied the wooden tools related to wool weaving such as looms, wool beaters and spindle whorls. All of the artists that visited plan to replicate a piece from the collection.

DeAnn Jacobson Jacobson's workshop grant focused on the weaving traditional Duwamish cattail mats. For the onsite portion of her grant in April 2016, Jacobson invited students from the North Kitshap School District to the Burke to study historical baskets and mats in the collections and then learn how to make cattail mats and cordage. Then in June, Jacobson held her offsite workshop in Kingston Middle School where the students at her previous onsite workshop helped teach the techniques they learned to younger students, contributed to the group cattail mat and learned how to make small cattail ducks. 

Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) In May and June 2016 the Bill Holm Center funded the last two months of a multi-tribal, year-long dugout canoe project initialized by the UCUT. The BHC supported UCUT for their work with their Washington state member tribes, the Colville, Spokane, and Kalispel. The historic project let to the revitalization of shovelnose canoes in Plateau native communities and culminated with a canoe journey to Kettle Falls, an ancient fishing site on the Columbia River. Project leaders also visited the Burke as a part of their grant to see the canoes, model canoes, and canoe materials in the collections.

Na'ah Illahee Fund The Na'ah Illahee Fund helped organize basketry workshops led by Cowlitz weaver Judy Bridges to teach classes on cedar bark weaving in April and August 2016. In August, workshop participants visited the Burke collections before their class to study the cedar bark basketry collections before their class to get inspiration for their weaving lesson the next day. Na'ah Illahee also held a cedar bark Salish hat class taught by Bridges in April with the help of the BHC workshop grant.

Brian Perry

Brian Perry

Dena Moses, Vera Best, Bernadine Phillips, and Gina Lawrence

Dena Moses, Vera Best, Bernadine Phillips, and Gina Lawrence (L-R) studying the Colville and Spokane basketry and beadwork collections (not pictured: Shelly Boyd and Norma McCrea) 

Suquamish Museum wool weaving onsite workshop

Suquamish Museum wool weaving onsite workshop with participants Denita Santos, Danille Morisette, Joseph Holmes, and BHC Outreach Coordinator Justin McCarthy (L-R), Photo by Kathy Cadigan

DeAnn Jacobson

DeAnn Jacobson's onsite cattail mat workshop at the Burke Museum 

The completed shovelnose canoes at Kettle Falls

The completed shovelnose canoes at Kettle Falls, WA from the Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) workshops

Na'ah Illahee Fund Onsite Collections-Based Workshop

Na'ah Illahee Fund Onsite Collections-Based Workshop

2014–2015 Recipients

Visiting Researcher Grants

Kelli Clifton
Kelli Clifton, Tsimshian artst, visited the Burke with her parents, Kristi and Oliver Clifton, to study Tsimshian art and gain inspiration for her art practice in July 2014.

Ariane Medley
Ariane Medley, Haida artist, studied Haida weavings including baskets, textiles, and woven basketry hats in August 2014.

David R. Boxley
Tsimshian artist David R. Boxley visited the Burke in August 2014 to study a wide variety of Northwest Coast material including Tsimshian, Nisga’a and Gitxsan carvings, baskets from Metlakatla, AK, and Tsimshian, Haida, and Tlingit gold and silver bracelets. Boxley also made a puppet which was featured in the 2014-15 Burke exhibition Here & Now: Native Artists Inspired.

Tyson Brown
Tyson Brown, Haida artist, visited the Burke in August 2014 with David R. Boxley to study Haida, Tsimshian, and Tlingit formline and sculptural art dated from the 18thto early 20thcenturies. 

Mary Wheeler-Goddard & Jennifer Younger
In August 2014 Tlingit artists Wheeler-Goddard and Younger studied engraved metal jewelry and other carved items to better understand Tlingit formline design and incorporate that into their own work. Their mentor, artist Nicholas Galanin, also joined for part of their research visit.

Peter Lind, Jr.
Peter Lind, Jr., Alutiiq/Aleut artist, visited in September 2014 to study the Alutiiq collections. He was particularly interested in the technological process that goes into making dolls, masks and kayaks.

Kelli Clifton with her parents

Kelli Clifton with her parents

Ariane Medley

Ariane Medley

David R. Boxley

David R. Boxley

Tyson Brown with David R. Boxley

Tyson Brown (L) with David R. Boxley (R)

Mary Goddard-Wheeler and Jennifer Younger

Mary Goddard-Wheeler (L) and Jennifer Younger (R)

Peter Lind, Jr.

Peter Lind, Jr.

Amy Phillips-Chan
Researcher Amy Chan came to the Burke in October 2014 to analyze our collection of 19th century Iñupiat masks. Through her research she helps to further the understanding of Iñupiat communities who practice mask-making, mask characteristics, and their roles in specific performances, ownership and use.

Cawston Research Group
Rodney Cawston (Nez Perce, Lakes & Okanogan), Colleen Cawston (Wenatchee), Rex Buck Jr. (Wanapum), Angela Buck (Yakama), Elaine Emerson (Methow & Okanogan), Wilson Wewa (Warm Springs & Paiute), and Arielle Cawston (Nez Perce, Lakes, Okanogan, & Wenatchee) visited in October 2014 to study Plateau beadwork, basketry, carvings and clothing. The artists collectively discussed both the techniques and functions of the pieces, with the goal of preserving cultural knowledge among their respective communities and sharing their new insights with younger generations.

Erin Gingrich
Erin Gingrich, an artist from the Nome Eskimo Community, visited the Burke to study carved wood bowls and masks as well as hand-sewn objects such as mittens, gloves, boots, and slippers in November 2014.

Joe Seymour
Joe Seymour, Squaxin Island/Acoma Pueblo artist, visited the collections to study Coast Salish spindle whorls, carved bowls and model canoes in December 2014. He was joined by his teacher/mentor Alex McCarty and fiancé Sandy Littletree.

Terresa White
Yup’ik artist Terresa White visited the Burke with her mother Louise White to study historic and contemporary Yup’ik objects including masks, mask attachments, carved figures, and dolls in February 2015. White creates multi-media masks influenced by these historic pieces.

Ruby Alexis & April Alexis
The Alexis sisters (Okanagan from the Syilx & Sinixt bands) visited the Burke Museum in March 2015 to study our Plateau collections including basketry, twined bags, hats, ropes, nets, parfleches, combs, horn bowls, and moccasins. The pair was particularly interested in traditional fibers like dogbane hemp, which they have been working with for the last five years. They will use their research here as inspiration in their own personal projects, to enhance their workshops, and to support the development of a Plateau-style art classes for younger generations.

Greg Archuleta & Greg Robinson
Greg Archuleta (Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde) and Greg Robinson (Chinook Nation) visited the Burke Museum in April 2015 to study the traditional art forms of the Columbia River region and Puget Sound including carved objects of wood, stone, bone and sheep horn and basketry. Their apprentice Ceara Lewis joined them as well (not pictured: Greg Archuleta).

Amy Chan

Amy Chan

Plateau Research Group

Plateau Research Group (L-R): Rodney Cawston, Wilson Wewa, Rex Buck, and Colleen Cawston. 

 Joe Seymour

Alex McCarty (L), Sandy Littletree (C), and Joe Seymour (R)

Terresa White

Terresa White with her mother

April Alexis (L) and Ruby Alexis (R)

April Alexis (L) and Ruby Alexis (R)

Greg Robinson

Greg Robinson (R) and apprentice Ceara Lewis (L) during his research visit with Greg Archuleta (not pictured)

Meghann O’Brien
Meghann O’Brien (Haida/Kuista and Kwakwaka’wakw/Alert Bay) came to the Burke in May 2015 to study Ravenstail and Naakiin (Chilkat) robes, aprons, and leggings from the 19th century. She finds inspiration and motivation for her own practice when researching and learning from the older pieces.

Rande Cook
Rande Cook, Kwakwaka’wakw artist, visited the Burke in May 2015 to study our Kwakwaka’wakw collections including silver and gold jewelry, carved masks and rattles, and copper pieces.

Collections-Based Workshop Grants

Jacqueline Fernandez & Rico Worl
In August 2014 Fernandez, Curator of Collections at the Sheldon Jackson Museum, organized a workshop for Worl (Tlingit) to teach students about formline design and how to paint their own skateboards with the designs they learned. Two of Worl’s decks were on display for the 2014-15 Burke exhibition Here & Now: Native Artists Inspired.

Bernadine Phillips 
Bernadine Phillips, Colville/Okanogan/Wenatchee artist, held a series of cedar root basketweaving workshops on the Kalispel Reservation in September 2014. Her workshops included instruction on both gathering materials and weaving techniques.

Patsy Whitefoot & Pat Courtney Gold
Patsy Whitefoot (Yakama Nation) and Pat Courtney Gold (Wasco/Warm Springs) received a Collections-Based Workshop grant to hold a workshop both onsite here at the Burke Museum in March 2015 as well as offsite on the Yakama Reservation in June 2015. Gold showed the students baskets in the Burke’s ethnology collections before teaching the students how to weave wapaas baskets, or root gathering bags. While offsite in Yakama, Gold taught the students how to weave cornhusk bags, techniques for natural fiber weaving and how to harvest and split dogbane, tule and cattail. Workshop participants will go on to teach other students about the techniques they have learned.

Susan Balbas & Theresa Parker
Susan Balbas of the Na’ah Illahee Fund organized a cedar basketweaving workshop at Daybreak Star Cultural Center in Seattle in June 2015. Participants learned how to weave from master Makah weaver Theresa Parker and used cedar bark harvested and prepared by Parker herself.

Ed Carriere
Ed Carriere (Suquamish) received a Collections-Based Workshop grant to teach his students about Suquamish basketry and the gathering of natural materials. Workshop participants joined Carriere in the Burke collections during their museum visit in July 2015 and were able to study parts of the 2,000 year old burden basket from the Biderbost wet site in our archaeology collections as well as the Carriere’s replica of that same basket in our ethnology collections. The offsite lessons take place at Carriere’s home in Indianola, WA throughout June and July 2015.

Meghann O'Brien

Meghann O'Brien

Rico Worl (Center) at his workshop at the Sheldon Jackson Museum in Sitka, AK

Rico Worl (Center) at his workshop at the Sheldon Jackson Museum in Sitka, AK

Bernadine Phillips Basketry Workshop at the Kalispel Reservation

Bernadine Phillips Basketry Workshop at the Kalispel Reservation

Patsy Whitefoot and Pat Courtney Gold Basketry Workshop at the Burke Museum

Patsy Whitefoot and Pat Courtney Gold Basketry Workshop at the Burke Museum

Na'ah Illahee Fund Basketry Workshop with Theresa Parker at the Daybreak Star Cultural Center

Na'ah Illahee Fund Basketry Workshop with Theresa Parker at the Daybreak Star Cultural Center

Ed Carriere Basketry Workshop at the Burke Museum

Ed Carriere Basketry Workshop at the Burke Museum

2013–2014 Recipients

Vising Researcher Grants

India Young
India Young, graduate student from the University of New Mexico, studied Northwest Coast silkscreen prints as part of the research for her doctoral dissertation.

Glenda McKay
Glenda McKay, Ingalik-Athabascan artist, studied a bird skin parkas in August 2013.

Wendy Proverbs
Wendy Proverbs, Kaska-Dene researcher, studied bark bowls in September 2013.

Joel Isaak
Joel Isaak, Kenaitze artist, studied the construction of skin bags in September 2013.

Avis O'Brien and Ernest Swanson
Avis O’Brien, Haida/Kwakwaka’wakw artist, and Ernest Swanson, Haida, studied masks in October 2013.

Lou-Ann Ika'wega Neel
Lou-Ann Ika'wega Neel, Kwakwaka’wakw artist, studied Kwakwaka’wakw textiles as well as model poles and other Kwakwaka'wakw art made by family members in November 2013.

David A. Boxley
In May 2013, David A. Boxley, Alaskan Tsimshian artist, conducted research on serving trays, bowls, bentwood boxes and bowls from the northern Northwest Coast. Boxley has dedicated the last 30 years and his artistic career to the revitalization and rebirth of Tsimshian arts and culture. He is also dedicated to saving the language by teaching Smalgyak classes to Tsimshian communities in Seattle and throughout Southeast Alaska.

Glenda McKay

Glenda McKay

Wendy Proverbs

Wendy Proverbs

Joel Isaak

Joel Isaak

Avis O'Brien and Ernest Swanson

Avis O'Brien (R) and Ernest Swanson (L)

Lou-ann Ika'wega Neel

Lou-ann Ika'wega Neel

David A. Boxley

David A. Boxley

Heather Callaghan
Heather Callaghan is Daklaweidi, Teslin Tlingit, and grew up in Yukon Territory. She has been mentored by Wayne Price, Victor Reece, Robert Tait, and Lorene Olivia Hanlon, among others, and works in a variety of media, including silver engraving, weaving, and carving. She studied the Tlingit collection at the Burke Museum in April 2013.

Da-ka-xeen Mehner
In January 2013, Tlingit artist Da-ka-xeen Mehner visited the Burke Museum to study Tlingit objects in the Ethnology collection His research at the Burke focused on Tlingit warriors' gear and masks as well as a broad range of other Tlingit objects.

Alison Bremner
In December 2012, Yakutat Tlingit artist Alison Bremner visited the Burke Museum to study Ravenstail and Naaxiin (Chilkat) weaving as well as other Tlingit objects.

Andrew Michael
Andrew Michael, Yupik/Inupiaq artist, came the Burke to study Yupik and Inupiaq masks and other objects in May 2014. Michael was interested in the manufacture of these artworks and how they were used to tell stories.

Dean Heron, Stan Bevan and Roberta Quock
Dean Heron, Kaska/Tlingit artist, and his mentor, Stan Bevan, Tahltan/Tlingit artist, came to research the Burke’s Chief Shakes collection as well as other Tlingit helmets, rattles and bentwood boxes from the Stikine region in June 2014. They were joined by Roberta Quock, Thompson-Okanagan/Tahltan artist, at the time a student at the Freida Diesing School where Heron and Bevan work.

Latham Mack and Dempsey Bob
Nuxalk artist Latham Mack and his mentor Tahltan/Tlingit artist Dempsey Bob came to the Burke to study Nuxalk frontlets, paddles, masks, and rattles among other objects in June 2014.

Workshop Grants

David A. Boxley
Tsimshian artists David Boxley held a series of design and carving classes at his workshop in Kingston, WA. The workshops consisted of 8 full days for 7 beginner students. The classes covered design, painting, and panel carving techniques as well as tool preparation.

Heather Callaghan

Heather Callaghan

Da-ka-xeen Mehner

Da-ka-xeen Mehner

Alison Bremner

Alison Bremner

Andrew Michael

Andrew Michael

(L-R) Dean Heron, Stan Bevan, and Roberta Quock

(L-R) Dean Heron, Stan Bevan, and Roberta Quock

(L-R) Dempsey Bob and Latham Mack

(L-R) Dempsey Bob and Latham Mack

2012–2013 Recipients

Gordon Greenwald, Owen James and Herb Sheakley
Three Tlinigit artists from Hoonah, Alaska, visited the Burke Museum in early November, 2012: Gordon Greenwald, Kaach Yaas, Chookaneidi Clan; Owen James, Kaa tlaax, Kiks.adi Clan; and Herb Sheakley, Yun Dus, Shungukeidi Clan. They are currently involved in a project to carve the components of a Tribal House to be built in Glacier Bay National Park at Bartlett Cove. Bill Holm Center Advisory Board member, Steve Brown, worked with them during their visit. This opportunity to study both traditional and contemporary carved objects at the Burke collection was focused on learning more about styles, techniques, and methods that they can bring back to their community to teach and incorporate within current and future projects.

Sonny Assu
Sonny Assu studied the Kwakwaka'wakw collection at the Burke Museum in July 2012. Assu is Ligwilda'xw of the We Wai Kai First Nation (Cape Mudge). An interdisciplinary artist, Assu merges Northwest Coast iconography with the aesthetics of popular culture to challenge the social and historical values placed upon both. He studied the Kwakwaka’wakw and other collections related to his art practice.

Lance Twitchell
X'unei Lance Twitchell, Tlinigit/Haida/Yup'ik artist and educator, received a visiting research grant at the Burke Museum in early July 2012. He has been a digital media artist, and his research on low relief carving and flat design at the Burke Museum will help him to move from digital design into low relief carving. His research was also focused on distinguishing between the Haida and Tlingit styles of art. While at the Burke he was able to consult with Bill Holm Center Director, Robin K. Wright, about Hydaburg genealogy.

Megan Smetzer
Dr. Megan Smetzer conducted research at the Burke Museum during the spring and summer 2012. Her research is focused on the 19th diffusion of beadwork along the Northwest Coast. Her specific project focused on the connection between Tlingit and Kwakwaka'wakw communities, particularly the role played by Anisalaga (Mary Ebbetts Hunt) in this often overlooked history. This work expands on her PhD thesis "Assimilation or Resistance? The Production and Consumption of Tlingit Beadwork".

Evelyn Vanderhoop
Haida artist Evelyn Vanderhoop is a naaxiin weaver, teacher, curator and consultant. She conducted research on the naaxiin weavings in the Burke Museum collection and archival documents from the UW Libraries in May 2012. Her research focuses on the early history of naaxiin weaving and the historical documents that reveal that Haida women were weavers of both Ravenstail and naaxiin robes (often referred to as Chilkat robes in the past). She is currently preparing a manuscript on naaxiin weaving for publication.

Christian White

Christian White came to the Burke Museum to study the work of his Haida ancestors, including his great-great grandfather Charles Edenshaw. He was particularly interested in ceremonial knife pommels, rattles, spoons, amulets headdresses, and argillite carvings. White found the experience to be an important step in his artistic career. 

 

2011–2012 Recipients

Frank Kodras
Frank Kodras, a beadwork researcher from Toronto, Ontario, received a Bill Holm Center Visiting Research grant from October 10-14, 2011, to examine the Burke Museum's beadwork collection. Frank met with Bill Holm Center Board Member Dr. Kate Duncan, to discuss differences in tribal styles of beadwork, the focus of his research.

Kay Parker
Kay Parker, an accomplished weaver from Juneau Alaska received a Bill Holm Center Visiting Research grant to examine the naaxiin (Chilkat) tunic in the Burke Museum collection, September 14-15, 2011. A Rasmussen Foundation grant allowed her to study the tunics in the Denver Art Museum and Portland Art Museum before visiting the Burke Museum.

Sonny Assu

Sonny Assu

Lance Twitchell

Lance Twitchell

Megan Smetzer

Megan Smetzer

Evelyn Vanderhoop

Evelyn Vanderhoop

Frank Kodras

Frank Kodras

Kay Parker

Kay Parker

2009–2010 Recipients

Melanie Ancheta
Melanie Ancheta, Bellingham artist and researcher, is studying the materials Northwest Coast indigenous artists used to make paintbrushes, pigments and binders, and other implements in relation to distinct regions prior to the availability of commercially manufactured materials.

Manuel Salazar
Manuel Salazar is affiliated with the Cowichan Tribe of Duncan, B.C, and lives in the Seattle area. His drum was featured on the poster for the In the Spirit of the Ancestors exhibit at the Burke Museum in 2007. Manuel Salazar studied Coast Salish prints at the Burke Museum in January 2009. 

Fred Fulmer 
Fred Fulmer, Sat-Kaa, is a carver and performing artist from the Chookaneidee, Eagle Brown Bear clan, from the Glacier or Ice House. He researched Tlingit carvings at the Burke Museum, March 30-April 2, 2009, focusing on paddles, bowls, spoons, seal clubs, canoes, combs, rattles, clappers, staffs, and war gear.

Robin Lovelace-Smith 
Robin Lovelace-Smith is a Tlingit sculptor, carver, and who has spent the last ten years training under, studying, and collaborating with Frank Perez, David Boxley, Donald Varnell, Nathan and Stephen Jackson. She was apprenticed to Stephen Jackson when he created Nearing Completion, the Kaats housepost (cat. no. 2006-85/1) for the Burke Museum in 2005. The main focus of her research is Taku River Tlingit Yanyeidí clan carvings, stories, songs, and regalia. She researched the Burke's Tlingit collection May 4-8, 2009.

Margaret Hartley
Margaret Hartley is a K-8 teacher at Saint Catherine School in North Seattle. She has a B.A. in art history from Auckland University in New Zealand, and a Masters of Education degree from Grand Canyon University, Arizona. She is developing a curriculum on Coast Salish art for K-8 students at her school, focusing on depictions of birds and fish. She studied Coast Salish prints at the Burke Museum, July 6-7, 2009.

 

2008–2009 Recipients

Felix Solomon 
Felix Solomon is a Lummi carver, who worked on the restoration of the Centennial Story Pole for Whatcom County. While a visiting researcher at the Bill Holm Center in December 2008, Felix studied Coast Salish art in the Burke Museum's Ethnology collection.

Jim Heaton
Jim Heaton has been studying and carving Northwest Coast style art since 1984. He carves totem poles, house posts, and many other types of smaller-scale objects. While he was a visiting researcher at the Bill Holm Center from Oct. 6-20, 2008, Jim demonstrated carving in the public gallery of the Museum, and gave a presentation at a University of Washington art history class on the building of "The House Like a Mirror," a traditional style long house built for the Chilkat Indian Village.

George J. Bennett Sr. 
George J. Bennett Sr. grew up in Hoonah, Alaska and is now a clan spokesperson for the T'akdaintaan clan of the Tlingit Raven Moiety. Bennett has been doing Tlingit art for the past twelve years, and studied with Wayne Price, Tommie Joseph, Reggie Petersen, Will Burkhart, Ernie Smeltzer, and Delores Churchill. While at the Burke Museum as a visiting researcher during July 21-30, he studied the Museum's Tlingit art, collection, including bentwood boxes and bowls, halibut hooks, masks and other sculpture.

Shgen George 
Shgen Doo Tan (Tlingit, Dakl’aweidí clan). George’s research visit focused on the Naaxiin (Chilkat) and Ravenstail weavings in the Burke’s collection, examining materials and techniques of these textiles. The Naaxiin octopus bag she wove after her visit was included in the  Burke’s Here & Now: Native Artists Inspired exhibit.

Arlene Skinner 
Arlene Skinner has been practicing her art of twined grass basket weaving for over 26 years, utilizing a natural method of curing wild beach grass. Her work combines fine twining and embroidery work with contemporary artistic design. She examined grass basketry in the Burke's collection. 

Manuel Salazar

Manuel Salazar

Fred Fulmer

Fred Fulmer

Robin Lovelace-Smith

Robin Lovelace

Felix Solomon

Felix Solomon

George Bennett, Sr.

George Bennett, Sr.

Shgen George

Shgen George

2007–2008 Recipients

Aaron Nelson-Moody 
Aaron Nelson-Moody / Tawx’sin Yexwulla / Poolxtun is from the Cheak'mus village, Squamish Nation, B.C. He has worked with community groups and students for the last 12 years sharing traditional teachings in Canada, and in Japan and Scotland. Nelson-Moody visited the Burke Museum in April 2007 to study a Squamish Spindle whorl in our collection. While at the Burke Museum he carved several spindle whorl replicas, talked to Dawn Glinsmann's ArtH 309 class, and demonstrated his carving in the Museum's public gallery. His copper replica of the Burke Museum spindle whorl was featured in the Burke's Here & Now: Native Artists Inspired exhibit in 2014-2015.

Emily L. Moore
Emily L. Moore is a graduate student in the Ph.D. program in art history at the University of California, Berkeley. Moore visited the Burke Museum in May 2007 to research Chilkat tunics, the topic of her master's thesis, and contemporary Tlingit art, the topic of her Ph.D. dissertation.

Tommy Joseph 
Tommy Joseph / Naal xák'w, of the Eagle Moiety, Kaagwaantaan Clan, has been actively engaged in Northwest Coast carving for over twenty years as an instructor, interpreter/demonstrator and as a commissioned artist. In March 2007, Tommy visited the Burke Museum to research the traditional Tlingit battle dress, daggers, and other Tlingit regalia in the collection. He talked to Dawn Glinsmann's ArtH 309 class, and also demonstrated carving in the Burke Museum public gallery. In addition he was able to share his knowledge about Tlingit daggers with UW art history graduate student and Bill Holm Center Fellow, Ashley Verplank.

Mike Webber
Mike Webber is an Alaskan Native, a self-employed fisherman and carver from Cordova, Alaska, of Tlingit and Alutiiq descent. He has studied carving with Bob Shaw in Cordova and Tlingit carvers, Nathan Jackson, Fred Trout, and Tommy Joseph. Mike visited the Burke Museum in October 2007 to study the Alutiiq and Tlingit collections, with the goal of carving replicas of some of the pieces in the collection.

 

2006–2007 Recipients

Mique'l (Askren) Dangeli
Mique'l Dangeli, PhD, was a graduate student in art history at the University of British Columbia at the time of her Bill Holm Center grant. She is Tsimshian and Tlingit from Metlakatla, Alaska. She was working on her master's thesis which focused on the work of a late 19th-century Tsimshian photographer named Benjamin Alfred Haldane from Metlakatla. Through her research, Dangeli has shown how B.A.'s photography contradicted this colonial narrative of Metlakatla's history by documenting the participation of Metlakatla's members in Tsimshian traditions that were thought to been replaced by Euro-American ways of living. The Burke Museum houses objects from Metlakatla that are stylistically similar to those in B.A.'s photographs . Mique'l focused her research on the Metlakatla material in the Ethnology collection as well as the historical photographs in the Ethnology Archives. 

Mike Dangeli
Mike Dangeli is a Nisga'a artist from Vancouver, B.C. He works in many different media including wood, leather/hide, canvas, bone, and paper. He became a professional artist in 1998 and has demonstrated and presented his artwork around the world, including United States, Canada, Germany, Austria, and Malaysia. He is also the leader of a dance group called the Git Hayetsk Dancers. Dangeli will focus his research on the 19th-century northern northwest coast collection at the Burke.

Lisa Telford
Lisa Telford is a Haida weaver from Everett, Washington. She apprenticed with master weavers Delores and Holly Churchill (her aunt and cousin). She came to the Burke to do research with her Haida apprentice, Shauna Colbert, and they studied the Northwest Coast basketry in the Burke’s collection.

Aaron Nelson-Moody

Aaron Nelson-Moody

Emily Moore

Emily Moore

Tommy Joseph

Tommy Joseph

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