Burke Blog

A photograph of a partial gorgonopsid lower jaw, but not the specimen in which the odontoma was discovered.

When paleontologists cut into the fossilized jaw of a distant mammal relative, they got more than they bargained for—more teeth, to be specific.

A rendering of the early marsupial relative, Didelphodon vorax.

A new study describes an early mammal that had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

Lower jaw of the T. rex

The Burke paleontology team is preparing a portion of the lower right jaw from the 66.3-million-year-old T. rex discovered this summer.

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

Hairy woodpecker specimens in the Burke collection

In addition to distinct belly coloration, Burke researchers found that species east and west of the North Cascades are genetically different.

The steel beams were delivered on site and crews got right to work assembling the building’s steel structure.

Steller's Jay on a branch

Do bird populations living on different mountain ranges evolve independently of one another?

2016 Canoe Journey Alki Beach landing

In celebration of Native American Heritage month, we’ve pulled together some facts and helpful resources.

New Burke construction crews are making steady progress despite the dreary fall weather and the walls of the lower level are nearly complete.

Jadeite Adze in Wood

This stone woodcarving adze—broken and embedded in a piece of cedar—is unlike most items in our archaeological collections. 

Tiny microfossil teeth

Studying microfossil teeth of the Sagebrush Vole from Washington state to understand a pattern of evolution.

Red-flanked bluetail

A rare Asian songbird was far off course last December when it fatally struck a window on Lopez Island.

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