Burke Blog

Exploring how (and when) whales, dolphins and porpoises evolved the ability to efficiently swim through the water. 

Beginning this week, vehicles will haul away dirt from the New Burke construction site at night to avoid daytime traffic impacts.

Dr. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Curator of Northwest Native Art

The Burke Museum is pleased to welcome Dr. Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse as the new Curator of Northwest Native Art.

Since the New Burke Groundbreaking Celebration on May 18, crews have been busy clearing the site. 

Student scanning a mammoth skull.

The Burke Museum and College of Engineering are collaborating to scan and 3D print a large-scale mammoth.

Over the next three years, some 70,000 native plants will be grown for the New Burke landscape.

student researchers in the ethnology collections

They come from diverse backgrounds and life experiences, but have come together to change perceptions. 

New Burke construction site

New Burke construction is underway! Check this page for notable construction updates.

An extinct animal often cited as a ‘missing link’ between modern seals and their four-limbed, land-dwelling ancestors.

Carnivore fossils in the Burke Museum paleontology collection.

How does competition between species affect their long-term evolution?

Speakers and children posing during the groundbreaking ceremony

More than 500 people gathered on May 18 to celebrate breaking ground on the New Burke Museum.

Hmong community members look at embroidery details in the Burke collections

Students and community members of all ages connect with Hmong objects in the Burke collections.

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