Burke Blog

Flying squirrel in tree

For hundreds of years, a species of flying squirrel was hiding right under (actually, above) our noses.

A new species of goby was discovered while being chased by an invasive lionfish outside of Curacao.

One year ago today, on May 18, 2016, we held our groundbreaking ceremony to officially kickoff construction of the New Burke Museum.

flowering purple butterfly bush

Graduate student John Chau discovers the origin of the Butterfly-bush, a familiar flowering plant in the Seattle area.

At the Burke, we have a lot of big dreams—from discovering a T. rex to inspiring the next generation of paleontologists, weavers, conservationists and scientists.

Analyzing the limited samples of the oviraptorosaur to answer lingering questions about this species' growth and anatomy.

The Burke Museum is working with researchers from Coastal Raptors to aid in conservation efforts for Washington's coastal raptors. 

Frogs across the world are threatened by many issues, including climate change, habitat loss and infectious diseases.

Burke archaeologists are working to preserve ancestral artifacts owned by the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe in the North Cascades. 

Model of a traditional Coast Salish longhouse

The roofline of the New Burke was inspired by the traditional structures of the Coast Salish people, the first people of Puget Sound.

UW Pacific Islander students used their experience as Burke researchers to decode Oceanic objects and traditions in Disney's Moana

Read about the Burke's research into what the future holds for spiders and other species in forest areas cleared for logging.

Pages

Back to Top