Burke Blog

Learn about the Burke's research on the coastal-tailed frog, one of the specimens on display in our Wild Nearby exhibit.

The New Burke celebrated the completion of the building's steel frame with the traditional "Topping Out" ceremony in early February 2017.

Mammaology researchers from the Burke traveled to the North Cascades in pursuit of the elusive Northern Bog Lemming.

Beginning 4,000 years ago, people shifted from living solely on wild foods to farming and raising domestic animals. Why did this change occur?

A Burke Museum graduate student travels to Colombia to study the tropical diversity of river-weed plants. 

A new method of sampling fossil leaves allows researchers to more accurately predict climate temperatures.

This month's time-lapse video shows quite the wide range of weather crews have experienced—from sunny days to snow.

A photograph of a partial gorgonopsid lower jaw, but not the specimen in which the odontoma was discovered.

When paleontologists cut into the fossilized jaw of a distant mammal relative, they got more than they bargained for—more teeth, to be specific.

A rendering of the early marsupial relative, Didelphodon vorax.

A new study describes an early mammal that had, pound-for-pound, the strongest bite force of any mammal ever recorded.

Lower jaw of the T. rex

The Burke paleontology team is preparing a portion of the lower right jaw from the 66.3-million-year-old T. rex discovered this summer.

More than fifty years ago, a 25-foot-long dugout canoe was found eroding out of a muddy bank of the Green River.

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