Burke Blog

Tyson Simmons (Muckleshoot), Dusty Humphries (Jamestown S'Klallam/Makah), Brian Perry (Port Gamble S'Klallam) study objects in the Burke Museum collections during their 2016-17 Visiting Researcher Grant visit.

Visiting researcher Tyson Simmons teamed up with the Bill Holm Center to host a tool-making workshop.

A young man holds up a basket as a small child peers at the underside

The Bill Holm Center recently brought museum objects and shared object-handling knowledge at a two-day basketry workshop.

Visiting researcher Sara ElShafie is looking at prehistoric reptiles fossils.

Visiting researcher Sara ElShafie looks at the effects of climate change on prehistoric reptiles.

The exterior of the new burke construction site as of November 17th, 2017

The New Burke building is now fully enclosed (just in time for the rain!) and the power is on.  

Reviving a Jukung through Burke Museum collections.

Burke researchers learn more about the Burke’s Balinese “jukung” outrigger canoe.

The Burke’s Paleontology team ventured to the Petrified Forest and found specimens that can answer questions about the Late Triassic period.

The Burke’s Paleontology team ventured to the Petrified Forest and found specimens that can answer questions about the Late Triassic period.  

Herbarium researcher Mark Darrach helped discovered a new plant species – and plans to auction off the right to name it.

Herbarium researcher Mark Darrach helped discovered a new plant species – and plans to auction off the right to name it. 

Animals being prepped in a visible lab at Testing, Testing 1-2-3.

Testing, Testing 1-2-3 included specimen prep in public view—here’s how people responded. 

Pile of the Elaphomyces truffles found in the ski boot.

The Herbarium helps to solve a mysterious discovery—in ski boots of all places! 

The T. rex skull in progress in the Testing, Testing 1-2-3 workroom

The T. rex skull jacket is open, with the skull and the teeth almost fully revealed. 

New Burke windows with blue sky

The New Burke siding continues to go up as the exterior elevator used by construction crews comes down. 

A crane is used to apply siding to the New Burke

The construction of the New Burke Museum continues to move at an impressive pace! Take a peek inside.

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