Burke Blog

Cybaeus reticulatus on yellow background

A picture that "looks just like" your spider does not identify it!

Spider on quarter

Please use inches or centimeters, not "silver dollars" or other coins, to describe the size of spiders!

Pacific Tree Frog

Pacific Tree Frogs usually live on the ground (despite their name) and hide in underground burrows.

Anaxyrus woodhousii

Woodhouse's Toads can be found in river valleys, meadows, grasslands, and marshes in southwestern region of Washington state.

Eye arrangements diagram

To identify spiders, you can't just look at 10-12 pictures! There are 50,000 species to choose from, separated by picky microscopic details.

Western Toad

Western Toads dig shallow burrows in loose ground or shelter under rocks or logs.

Tip of leg of orbweaving spider, showing claws.

The oft-repeated "spiders don't stick to their own webs thanks to oil on the feet" is wrong — the story is much more complicated.

Tailed Frog

Tailed Frog males do not vocalize, possibly because the females cannot hear calls over fast-moving water in streams.

Remains of rove beetle

Books say spiders don't eat solids but "suck the juices" of their prey. False! All spiders digest solids externally with vomited enzymes.

Rough-Skinned Newt

Rough-Skinned Newts will display a bright colored underside when threatened.

Cartoon by Owen Curtsinger showing a concerned commuter 3 feet from a spider

Despite "common knowledge," the nearest spider could be hundreds of meters away—or right under your feet. It depends!

Cartoon by Owen Curtsinger of spider taking it easy in the summer

In late summer when people notice garden orbweavers and giant house spiders, most native spiders are juvenile.

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